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History

Course Descriptions

HIST 030: Civics in Action

Credits: Maximum of 5.0 possible

Participation in various activities that promote understanding of government at all levels. Emphasis will be on rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Counts toward U.S. History, Contemporary World Problems, Washington state civics credit.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Explain the core values and democratic principles of the U.S. as set forth in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.  [REASON] 
  2. Analyze the purposes, organization and function of federal, state and local government.  [REASON] 
  3. Demonstrate the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the principles of democratic civic involvement.  [ACT] 

HIST 032: U.S. History I

Credits: 5.0

An examination of selected issues and topics in U.S. history from pre-colonial times to the Civil War. Includes study of U.S. Constitution and government. Counts toward high school U.S. History I credit.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify and describe contributions made by early American cultures.  [REASON] 
  2. Identify events, trends, individuals and movements that helped shape America.  [REASON] 
  3. Identify and create examples of how technological advances shaped America.  [Explore] 
  4. Describe and identify the importance of the foundational documents.  [REASON] 
  5. Relate the past to present, be able to explain how history repeats itself.  [EXPLORE] 
  6. Communicate core concepts and ideas in U.S. history from pre-colonial times to the Civil War.  [COMMUNICATE] 
  7. Research, compare and analyze perspectives within this time period using multiple source materials.  [EXPLORE] 

HIST 033: U.S. History II

Credits: 5.0

An examination of selected issues and topics in U.S. history from the Civil War to the Civil Rights era. Includes study of the U.S. Constitution and government. Counts toward high school U.S. History II and/or Contemporary World Problems credit.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify, describe and discuss achievements and trends of cultures and individuals during from the Civil War to the Civil Rights era.  [COMMUNICATE] 
  2. Identify and show examples of how technological advances shaped America.  [EXPLORE] 
  3. Identify and interpret the major ideas set forth in the Constitution that effect this period of History.  [REASON] 
  4. Analyze the Emancipation Proclamation, and the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments that defined and broadened Civil Rights in America.  [EXPLORE] 
  5. Communicate core concepts and ideas in U.S. history from the Civil War to the Civil Rights era.  [COMMUNICATE] 
  6. Research, compare and analyze perspectives within this time period using multiple source materials.  [REASON] 

HIST 034: Contemporary World Issues I

Credits: 5.0

A study of U.S. foreign policy issues and their impact on other countries. Topics covered may include terrorism, U.S. military involvement, global trade agreements, U.S. defense policy and others. Counts toward high school U.S. History II and/or Contemporary World Problems credit .

Course Level Objectives

  1. Apply knowledge of maps, charts, and other geographic tools to understand the spatial arrangement of people, places, resources, and environments on earth's surface.  [EXPLORE] 
  2. Define the purposes and organization of international relationships and how U.S. foreign policy is made.  [REASON] 
  3. Identify various historical, social, economic and political issues from selected regions of the world.  [REASON] 
  4. Analyze and evaluate various historical, social, economic and political issues from selected regions of the world.  [REASON] 
  5. Apply a variety of strategies to communicate information on current international issues to a wide range of audiences.  [COMMUNICATE] 

HIST 035: U.S. Contemporary Issues II

Credits: 5.0

A study of relevant topics affecting U.S. domestic policy issues may include education, the environment, healthcare, crime and the economy. Includes study of U.S. Constitution and federal government. Counts toward high school U.S. II and/or Contemporary World Problems credit.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Analyze the purpose and organization of U.S. government and laws.  [REASON] 
  2. Explain the organization of government at the federal, state and local levels including the executive, legislative and judicial branches.  [REASON] 
  3. Describe individual rights and their accompanying responsibilities at the local, state, national levels.  [COMMUNICATE] 
  4. Explain the Bill of Rights and describe some of the individual rights guaranteed by this document.  [COMMUNICATE] 
  5. Analyze opposing arguments on current domestic (U.S.) issues.  [REASON] 
  6. Explain how various stakeholders' opinions, including corporations, government agencies and the public, influence public policy.  [EXPLORE] 
  7. Analyze the role of government as participant in the U.S. economy through taxation, spending and policy setting.  [REASON] 
  8. Communicate ideas clearly and effectively.  [COMMUNICATE] 

HIST 041: U.S. in the Nuclear Age

Credits: 5.0

An examination of historical, social, political, and economic developments of the U.S. from 1945 to the present. Counts toward high school U.S. II and/or Contemporary World Problems credit.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify and describe contributions of a variety of cultures to U.S. history during the period.  [REASON] 
  2. Identify and explain how events, trends, individuals, and movements shaped the United States into a dominant world power.  [REASON] 
  3. Analyze and evaluate how decisions made in post WWII politics impact American's relationships with other countries today.  [REASON] 
  4. Relate history to personal experience and current issues.  [COMMUNICATE] 
  5. Communicate core concepts and ideas in U.S. history during this time period.  [COMMUNICATE] 
  6. Compare and analyze multiple perspectives of an event within this time period using primary and secondary source materials.  [EXPLORE] 

HIST 044: History Through Culture

Credits: 5.0

An exploration of key events or eras in U.S. history through the cultural expressions of the times. Examination of how popular culture, music, art, theater, film and literature expressed or informed events and experiences. Counts toward high school U.S. II and/or Contemporary World Problems credit.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Describe the role that cultural expressions play in both reflecting and informing historical events.  [REASON] 
  2. Analyze how both dominant and nondominant cultural groups experienced historical events by examining their own cultural expressions.  [REASON] 
  3. Identify how cultural expressions can shape personal views of history.  [EXPLORE] 
  4. Connect personal, cultural perspectives to historical events.  [EXPLORE] 
  5. Apply a variety of research strategies to collect information.  [REASON] 
  6. Synthesize information from a variety of sources to communicate information and ideas.  [COMMUNICATE] 

HIST 049: Current Issues in the Pacific Northwest

Credits: 5.0

Exploration of current political, environmental, social and economic issues impacting the Pacific Northwest. Includes study of the Washington State Constitution. Counts toward Washington State History and/or Contemporary World Problems credit.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Examine major ideas, themes, developments, turning points, chronology, and cause-and-effect relationships in the Pacific Northwest.  [REASON] 
  2. Connect patterns of habitation in the Pacific Northwest to geographic characteristics and global events.  [REASON] 
  3. Compare and contrast multiple perspectives and different interpretations of the development of the Pacific Northwest.  [EXPLORE] 
  4. Examine current environmental and political issues in the Pacific Northwest.  [REASON] 
  5. Describe the purpose and key functions of state and local government.  [REASON] 

HIST 060: Enduring Cultures: Communities in Change

Credits: Maximum of 5.0 possible

Examines the environmental, social, political and economic impacts on major civilizations throughout history. Analyzes how knowledge of world cultures helps build understanding of today's global issues. High School completion class. Counts toward World Civics or Contemporary World Problems credit.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Apply knowledge of historical thinking, chronology, eras, turning points, major ideas, individuals, and themes in world history in order to evaluate how history shapes the present and future.  [REASON] 
  2. Identify and analyze the causal factors that shaped major events in history.  [REASON] 
  3. Analyze how cultures and cultural groups have shaped world history. [REASON [REASON] 
  4. Analyze how an understanding of world history can help us prevent problems today.  [REASON] 
  5. Analyze and evaluate how people across the world have addressed issues involved with the distribution of resources and sustainability in the past or present.  [REASON] 
  6. Apply the concepts of location, region, and movement and demonstrate knowledge of how geographic features and human cultures impact environments.  [REASON] 
  7. Express own viewpoint and recognize the viewpoints of others in the context of a discussion.  [COMMUNICATE] 

HIST 104: African-American History to 1865:CD

Credits: 5.0

Examines the African-American historical experience from its West African origins through the end of the Civil War, emphasizing those individuals, groups, movements, events, issues, and ideas that shaped early African-American civilization. Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENGL 100. Crosslisted as: DIVST 117.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Examine and evaluate historical information/arguments from different source forms.  [REASON] 
  2. Express their findings in formal/informal writing, classroom discussion, and/or oral presentation.  [COMMUNICATE] 
  3. Identify seminal events, movements, and institutions in African-American history up until the Civil War, along with the key figures, groups, and ideas that contributed to their creation and development.  [EXPLORE] 
  4. Compare/contrast the philosophies, issues, and actions of different African-Americans from different regions, time periods, and/or social status.  [EXPLORE] 
  5. Compare/contrast the experiences of African-Americans with those of other diverse populations.  [EXPLORE] 

HIST 105: African-American History 1865-1945:CD

Credits: 5.0

Examines the African-American historical experience from the end of the Civil War until the end of World War II, emphasizing individuals, groups, movements, events, issues, and ideas that shaped African- American civilization after the end of slavery. Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENGL 100. Crosslisted as: DIVST 118.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify seminal events, movements, and institutions in African-American history between the end of the Civil War and the start of World War II, along with the key figures, groups, and ideas that contributed to their creation and development.  [EXPLORE] 
  2. Compare/contrast the philosophies, issues, and actions of different African-Americans from different regions, time periods, and/or social status.  [REASON] 
  3. Compare/contrast the experiences of African-Americans with those of other diverse populations.  [REASON] 
  4. Examine and evaluate historical information/arguments from different source forms.  [REASON] 
  5. Express their findings in formal/informal writing, classroom discussion, online discussion, research projects, and/or oral presentation.  [COMMUNICATE] 
  6. Apply knowledge, awareness, and/or skills to identify and analyze issues related to diversity.  [EXPLORE] 

HIST 106: African-American History from 1945:CD

Credits: 5.0

Examines the African-American historical experience from the end of World War II through the 1970s, emphasizing those individuals, groups, political and artistic movements, events, issues, and ideas that shaped modern African-American civilization. Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENGL 100. Crosslisted as: DIVST 119.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify seminal events, movements, and institutions in African-American history after World War II, along with the key figures, groups, and ideas that contributed to their creation and development.  [EXPLORE] 
  2. Compare/contrast the philosophies, issues, and actions of different African-Americans from different regions, time periods, and/or social status.  [REASON] 
  3. Compare/contrast the experiences of African-Americans with those of other diverse populations.  [REASON] 
  4. Examine and evaluate historical information/arguments from different source forms.  [REASON] 
  5. Express their findings in formal/informal writing, classroom discussion, online discussion, research projects, and/or oral presentation.  [COMMUNICATE] 
  6. Apply knowledge, awareness, and/or skills to identify and analyze issues related to diversity.  [EXPLORE] 

HIST 111: Greek History

Credits: 5.0

The history of Greece from the Bronze Age to 399 B.C.. Emphasis upon political, social, and cultural history. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 100 with a grade of 2.0 or higher.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify seminal events, movements, and institutions of Greek history, along with the key figures, groups, and ideas that contributed to their creation and development.  [REASON] 
  2. Identify the basic elements of Greek historiography: the process by which history gets written down; the kinds of sources that are used; how the nature of the sources influences the form of the narrative; how the historical narrative reveals the ideology of the historian; and how the historical narrative is influenced by the biases of political class and social status of the historian.  [REASON] 
  3. Describe and analyze the cultural and commercial interchanges between Greece and the cultures of North Africa, the Near East, and Asia.  [EXPLORE] 
  4. Describe and analyze the marginalization of groups and social classes within Greece, such as women, slaves, helots, metics or residential aliens, prostitutes, and hetaerae.  [EXPLORE] 
  5. Examine and evaluate historical information/arguments from different source forms.  [REASON] 
  6. Express their findings in formal/informal writing, classroom discussion, online discussion, research projects, and/or oral presentation.  [COMMUNICATE] 

HIST 112: Roman History

Credits: 5.0

History of Rome from 800 B.C. to 138 A.D.; emphasis on political, social, and cultural history. Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENGL& 101.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify seminal events, movements, and institutions of Roman history, along with the key figures, groups, and ideas that contributed to their creation and development.  [REASON] 
  2. Identify the basic elements of Roman historiography: the process by which history gets written down; the kinds of sources that are used; how the nature of the sources influences the form of the narrative; how the historical narrative reveals the ideology of the historian; and how the historical narrative is influenced by the biases of political class and social status of the historian.  [REASON] 
  3. Describe and analyze the relationships between the central administration and the provinces throughout the Empire with respect to commerce, political relations, and cultural exchange.  [REASON] 
  4. Describe and analyze the marginalization of groups and social classes within Rome, such as women, slaves, prostitutes, and resident aliens, as well as the process by which citizenship was conferred and denied in the Republic and the Empire.  [EXPLORE] 
  5. Examine and evaluate historical information/arguments from different source forms.  [REASON] 
  6. Express their findings in formal/informal writing, classroom discussion, online discussion, research projects, and/or oral presentation.  [COMMUNICATE] 

HIST& 116: Western Civilization I

Credits: 5.0

Development of man from prehistoric days to the late Middle Ages. Cultural, political and economic aspects of the great civilizations that developed during this period. Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENGL 100.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify seminal events, movements, and institutions in Western history during the period from prehistory until the late Middle Ages, along with the key figures, groups, and ideas that contributed to their creation and development.  [REASON] 
  2. Compare/contrast the philosophies, issues, and actions of different geographic regions, time periods, religions, races, and/or social status.  [REASON] 
  3. Examine and evaluate historical information/arguments from different source forms.  [REASON] 
  4. Express their findings in formal/informal writing, classroom discussion, online discussion, research projects, and/or oral presentation.  [COMMUNICATE] 

HIST& 117: Western Civilization II

Credits: 5.0

Examines the history of Europe from the Middle Ages to end of the Napoleonic Wars, including such topics as the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, the age of exploration, the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution. Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENGL 100.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify seminal events, movements, and institutions in European history during the period between the late Middle Ages and the end of the Napoleonic Wars, along with the key figures, groups, and ideas that contributed to their creation and development.  [REASON] 
  2. Compare/contrast the philosophies, issues, and actions of different geographic regions, time periods, religions, races, and/or social status.  [REASON] 
  3. Examine and evaluate historical information/arguments from different source forms.  [REASON] 
  4. Express their findings in formal/informal writing, classroom discussion, online discussion, research projects, and/or oral presentation.  [COMMUNICATE] 

HIST& 118: Western Civilization III

Credits: 5.0

Examines the history of Europe from the end of the Napoleonic Wars to the present, including such topics as the Industrial Revolution, the rise of ideologies such as socialism and fascism, the origins and impact of the World Wars, and the move toward a European Unio). Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENGL 100.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify seminal events, movements, and institutions in European history during the period between the end of the Napoleonic Wars until the present, along with the key figures, groups, and ideas that contributed to their creation and development.  [REASON] 
  2. Compare/contrast the philosophies, issues, and actions of different geographic regions, time periods, religions, races, and/or social status.  [REASON] 
  3. Examine and evaluate historical information/arguments from different source forms.  [REASON] 
  4. Express their findings in formal/informal writing, classroom discussion, online discussion, research projects, and/or oral presentation.  [COMMUNICATE] 

HIST& 146: United States History I:CD

Credits: 5.0

Examines the history of the United States from pre-Columbian civilizations through the election of Andrew Jackson, with particular emphasis on the American Revolution, the framing of the Constitution, the origins of sectionalism, and issues of race, class and gender. Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENGL 100.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify seminal events, movements, and institutions in American history from pre-Columbian civilizations until the election of Andrew Jackson, along with the key figures, groups, and ideas that contributed to their creation and development.  [REASON] 
  2. Compare/contrast the philosophies, issues, and actions of different geographic regions, time periods, religions, races, and/or social status.  [REASON] 
  3. Identify and analyze the experiences of Americans from different religions, ethnicities, races, and genders.  [EXPLORE] 
  4. Examine and evaluate historical information/arguments from different source forms.  [REASON] 
  5. Express their findings in formal/informal writing, classroom discussion, online discussion, research projects, and/or oral presentation.  [COMMUNICATE] 
  6. Apply knowledge, awareness, and/or skills to identify and analyze issues related to diversity.  [EXPLORE] 

HIST& 147: United States History II:CD

Credits: 5.0

History of the United States from Andrew Jackson to the start of World War I, with particular emphasis on the road to the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Second Industrial revolution, the development of American culture and society, and issues of race, class, and gender. Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENGL 100.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify seminal events, movements, and institutions in American history from the election of Andrew Jackson until the start of World War I, along with the key figures, groups, and ideas that contributed to their creation and development.  [REASON] 
  2. Compare/contrast the philosophies, issues, and actions of different geographic regions, time periods, religions, races, and/or social status.  [REASON] 
  3. Identify and analyze the experiences of Americans from different religions, ethnicities, races, and genders.  [EXPLORE] 
  4. Examine and evaluate historical information/arguments from different source forms.  [REASON] 
  5. Express their findings in formal/informal writing, classroom discussion, online discussion, research projects, and/or oral presentation.  [COMMUNICATE] 
  6. Apply knowledge, awareness, and/or skills to identify and analyze issues related to diversity.  [EXPLORE] 

HIST& 148: United States History III:CD

Credits: 5.0

World War I to the end of the Cold War, with emphasis on the two World Wars, the Great Depression and New Deal, the development of modern American society, the Cold War, and issues of race, class and gender. Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENGL 100.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify seminal events, movements, and institutions in American history from World War I until the end of the Cold War, along with the key figures, groups, and ideas that contributed to their creation and development.  [REASON] 
  2. Compare/contrast the philosophies, issues, and actions of different geographic regions, time periods, religions, races, and/or social status.  [REASON] 
  3. Identify and analyze the experiences of Americans from different religions, ethnicities, races, and genders.  [EXPLORE] 
  4. Examine and evaluate historical information/arguments from different source forms.  [REASON] 
  5. Express their findings in formal/informal writing, classroom discussion, online discussion, research projects, and/or oral presentation.  [COMMUNICATE] 
  6. Apply knowledge, awareness, and/or skills to identify and analyze issues related to diversity.  [EXPLORE] 

HIST 155: Special Topics in History

Credits: 5.0

Examines specialized topics in History, usually centered on a particular theme, person, event, or era. The particular topic will vary with each offering and will be dependent upon faculty and student interest. Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENGL 100.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify seminal figures, groups, ideas, events, movements, and institutions within the particular subject, along with their impact(s).  [REASON] 
  2. Compare/contrast the philosophies, issues, and actions of different figures, groups, time periods, regions, and/or cultures, when appropriate.  [REASON] 
  3. Examine and evaluate historical information/arguments from different source forms.  [REASON] 
  4. Express their findings in formal/informal writing, classroom discussion, online discussion, research projects, and/or oral presentation.  [COMMUNICATE] 

HIST& 214: Pacific Northwest History

Credits: 5.0

Examines the history of Washington and the Pacific Northwest from before European arrival to the present, including the region's economic, political, and cultural developments, the unique contributions of diverse peoples, and the region's connection to national events. Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENGL 100.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify seminal events, movements, and institutions in Pacific Northwest history from before European arrival until the present, along with the key figures, groups, and ideas that contributed to their creation and development.  [REASON] 
  2. Identify and analyze the unique contributions of the various peoples of the Pacific Northwest and the critical role of race, religion, gender, and class in the region's history.  [EXPLORE] 
  3. Identify and analyze connections between regional history and national/global developments.  [REASON] 
  4. Examine and evaluate historical information/arguments from different source forms.  [REASON] 
  5. Express their findings in formal/informal writing, classroom discussion, online discussion, research projects, and/or oral presentation.  [COMMUNICATE] 

HIST 215: Technology and American Culture

Credits: 5.0

Examines the history of American technology from colonial times to the present, emphasizing the interaction between innovation, culture, and social change. Topics explored include artisan culture, the American manufacturing system technology, and women's work, radio, television, cars, computers, and military weapons. Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENGL 100.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify seminal events, movements, and institutions in the history of American technology, along with the key figures, groups, and ideas that contributed to their creation and development.  [REASON] 
  2. Compare/contrast the American experience with technology with that of other nations in order to understand how culture and environment shape technological innovation, how innovation in turn shapes culture and environment, and how technology is transferred between nations.  [REASON] 
  3. Compare/contrast the creation and development of technology within the private and public sectors, with sharp focus on the role of government in the creation, development and selection of technology.  [REASON] 
  4. Examine and evaluate historical information/arguments from different source forms.  [REASON] 
  5. Express their findings in formal/informal writing, classroom discussion, online discussion, research projects, and/or oral presentation.  [COMMUNICATE] 

HIST 230: Revolutions in Modern History

Credits: 5.0

Examines the American, French, Russian, Chinese, and other national revolutions, emphasizing a comparative analysis of the individuals, groups, movements, events, issues, ideas, and other forces that shaped each revolution. Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENGL 100.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify and analyze the history of each individual revolution, as well as the impact of one or more revolution upon another.  [REASON] 
  2. Identify and analyze seminal individuals, groups, movements, events, issues, ideas, and other forces that shaped one or more modern revolution.  [REASON] 
  3. Identify and analyze the role of race, class, gender, geography, and religion on modern revolutionary movements.  [EXPLORE] 
  4. Identify and analyze the role of various "isms" that influenced modern revolutionary movements, such as imperialism, federalism, socialism, Marxism-Leninism, and nationalism.  [REASON] 
  5. Compare/contrast modern revolutions on cause, characteristics, and impact.  [REASON] 
  6. Examine and evaluate historical information/arguments from different source forms.  [REASON] 
  7. Express their findings in formal/informal writing, classroom discussion, online discussion, research projects, and/or oral presentation.  [COMMUNICATE] 

HIST 246: Modern East Asian History:CD

Credits: 5.0

Examines the cultural, political, military, and economic history of East Asia from 1800 until the present, with particular emphasis on China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia. Satisfies non-Western history requirement for AA degree in Elementary Education. Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENGL 100.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify seminal events, issues, movements, and institutions within East Asian history from 1800 to the present, along with the key figures, groups, and ideas that contributed to their creation.  [EXPLORE] 
  2. Identify seminal events, issues, movements, and institutions that shaped East Asian relations with the Western world, as well as between individual countries in the region.  [EXPLORE] 
  3. Identify and analyze the philosophies, issues, and actions of different countries, time periods after 1800, religions, ethnicities, and social classes.  [REASON] 
  4. Examine and evaluate historical information/arguments from different source forms.  [REASON] 
  5. Express their findings in formal/informal writing, classroom discussion, online discussion, research projects, and/or oral presentation.  [COMMUNICATE] 
  6. Apply knowledge, awareness, and/or skills to identify and analyze issues related to diversity.  [EXPLORE] 

HIST 248: The United States in World Affairs: Since 1945

Credits: 5.0

Examines the history of American foreign relations, with particular emphasis on the Cold War era. Key figures, events, writings, and doctrines will be examined, along with the role of social, political, and economic forces in the making and implementation of American foreign policy. Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENGL 100.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify and analyze seminal events, movements, and institutions in the history of American foreign relations, along with the key figures, groups, and ideas that contributed to their creation and development.  [REASON] 
  2. Identify and analyze the role of race, religion, belief system, nationality, and other elements on the theory and practice of American foreign policy.  [REASON] 
  3. Identify and analyze the relationship between foreign policy and domestic affairs.  [REASON] 
  4. Examine and evaluate historical information/arguments from different source forms.  [REASON] 
  5. Express their findings in formal/informal writing, classroom discussion, online discussion, research projects, and/or oral presentation.  [COMMUNICATE] 

HIST 255: Special Topics in History

Credits: 5.0

Examines specialized topics in History, usually centered on a particular theme, person, event, or era. The particular topic will vary with each offering and will be dependent upon faculty and student interest. Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENGL 100.

Course Level Objectives

  1. Identify seminal figures, groups, ideas, events, movements, and institutions within the particular subject, along with their impact(s).  [REASON] 
  2. Compare/contrast the philosophies, issues, and actions of different figures, groups, time periods, regions, and/or cultures, when appropriate.  [REASON] 
  3. Examine and evaluate historical information/arguments from different source forms.  [REASON] 
  4. Express their findings in formal/informal writing, classroom discussion, online discussion, research projects, and/or oral presentation.  [COMMUNICATE]