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Creative Retirement Institute

Winter 2015 Classes: Jan. 5-March 20

Registration Form

To find out more about a specific class, select its class number. You don't need to be a member to enroll in classes.

Item Dates Day Class Title Cost
C958 01/05/15—02/02/15 M Geology of National Parks, Part II $44
C984 01/05/15-02/02/15 M Israel and Palestine Through Film $49
C904 01/06/15-01/27/15 T Bananas: How the United Fruit Company Shaped U.S. Foreign Policy $44
C906* 01/06/15-01/27/15 T Late Medieval History: Phoenix Rising Sect. A -- FULL $44
C854* 01/07/15-01/14/15 W Email in a Mobile World $22
C900 01/07/15-01/28/15 W American Collectors' Museums $49
C996 01/08/15 TH Writing Historical Novels $16
C872 01/08/15-01/29/15 TH Current Issues in Economicsl $44
C916 01/09/15-01/23/15 F Natural Supernatural: Nordic Folklore $33
C870 01/09/15-01/30/15 F The Changing World of Energy 2015 $44
C892 01/15/15-02/05/15 TH Principles of Human Cardiovascular Function $44
C876* 01/20/15-01/27/15 TH The International Student Experience $22
C915 01/21/15-02/11/15 W Monsters and Hybrids in Medieval English Literature $44
C906* 01/30/15-02/20/15 F Late Medieval History: Phoenix Rising Sect. B $44
C946 02/03/15-02/24/15 T Journeys of Paul $44
C878 02/03/15-02/17/15 T Yearning to Breathe Free: Still a Nation of Immigrants $33
C917 02/05/15-02/26/15 TH Reading William Butler Yeats $44
C920 02/06/15-02/20/15 F Winesburg, Ohio: Sherwood Anderson $33
C944* 02/06/15-02/27/15 F Comparative Religion -- FULL $44
C850 02/11/15 W Considering and Exploring Windows: 8.1 and Future Versions $11
C913 02/12/15-03/05/15 TH Danish Crime Novels $44
C912 02/18/15-03/11/15 W "The Alberta Trilogy" by Cora Sandel $44
C956 02/18/15-03/11/15 W Future Climate of Pacific Northwest $44
C922 02/19/15-03/12/15 TH Made in the USA: Three Centuries of American Classical Music $49
C918* 02/24/15-03/17/15 T Shakespeare's "Measure for Measure" $44
C919 02/23/15-03/16/15 M Sociology Meets Literature: Stratification $44
C960 02/23/15-03/16/15 M Shorelines of the World $44
C902* 02/24/15-03/17/15 T The American Revolution -- FULL $44
C982* 02/27/15-03/13/15 F Alfred Hitchcock Goes to Hollywood: Three Classic Movies $42
C914 02/27/15-03/20/15 F Fact and Fiction--Registration Required -- FULL NO FEE
C890 03/03/15-03/17/15 T Healthy Aging $33
C874 03/05/15-03/12/15 TH European Union Update: Europe After the Crisis -- FULL $22
C852* 03/06/15-03/13/15 F The E-book Conundrum: Libraries and Their Digital Customers $22

* Denotes Concurrent Classes

Note: Classes marked FULL may have a waiting list; call 425.640.1830 if you are interested in that class.

*Note: Remember to check for changes in class schedule before the first day of class.


√ GEOLOGY OF NATIONAL PARKS, PART II

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C958 01/05/15—02/02/15 Mon. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Donn Charnley CON $44

We shall discuss the Parks and Monuments selected for their display of outstanding features of complex plutonic and/or volcanic igneous activity, and/or metamorphism.

National Parks: Acadia, Crater Lake, Grand Canyon, Grand Teton, North Cascades, Great Smoky Mountains, Glacier, Hawaii, Lassen, Yosemite, Mt. Rushmore.

National Monuments: Capulin Volcano, Craters of the Moon, Devils Postpile, Devils Tower, Lava Beds, Lava Butte, Mt. Saint Helens, Newberry Crater, Sunset Crater, Crazy Horse.

Donn will print out a color copy of the class notes for anyone desiring one – cost $5. To order one please call the CRI office (425-640-1830) as soon as you have registered for this course. If you do not want to purchase a color copy, black and white copies will be provided free of charge. Donn Charnley is emeritus professor of geology at Shoreline CC. He earned his MS in geology from UW, and has taught for Seattle Public Schools, Shoreline CC, UW and CRI. 4 sessions. No class January 19 – holiday.


√ ISRAEL AND PALESTINE THROUGH FILM

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C984 01/05/15-02/02/15 Monday 1:00pm–3:30pm Zaki Abdelhamid CON $49

The history, politics and culture of Palestine and Israel is complex and often can be misinterpreted when viewed from an American or foreign perspective. We will examine the complexity through two Israeli and two Palestinian films. Each of these films will provide ample points of discussion as we tackle the tough issues associated with those nations. Zaki Abdelhamid is an Arab immigrant from Jordan. He received a BA degree in theater from the University of New York (Albany), and an MA in fine arts in acting from the University of Delaware. He is a program manager at Humanities Washington, where he produces hundreds of Humanities themed lecturesand discussion programs throughout the state. Zaki is also a speaker on Middle Eastern films, and has taught a class on Middle Eastern film studies at Edmonds Community College. 4 sessions. No class January 19 – holiday.


√ BANANAS: HOW THE UNITED FRUIT FRUIT COMPANY SHAPED US FOREIGN POLICY

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C904 01/06/15–01/27/15 Tuesdays 10:00am–12:00pm Kathy Ludgate ESC $44

Coined by American author O. Henry, the term "banana republic" has come to mean a politically unstable country whose economy is dependent on the exploitation of plantation agriculture for private profit. With tropical fruit plantations in Central America (mainly banana), the United Fruit Company has had a deep and long-lasting impact on the economic and political development of Central American countries and on US foreign policy. This mini-course on Central American history and politics will span seven decades with a cast of characters that includes seven US presidents, cabinet members, marines, dictators, revolutionaries, corporate pirates, spies...and of course, Carmen Miranda! It gives historical background to today's news. After this class, you'll never look at a banana in the same way. Before or during the class, you are encouraged to read "Banana: The Fate of the Fruit That Changed the World" by Dan Koepel and "The Fish That Ate the Whale: The Life and Times of America's Banana King" by Rich Cohen. Kathy Ludgate has a BA in history from Gonzaga University and an MA in teacher leadership from Lesley University. 4 sessions.


√ LATE MEDIEVAL HISTORY: THE PHOENIX RISING SECT. A  --FULL

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C906* 01/06/15–01/27/15 Tuesday 1:00pm–3:00pm Kristi Busch FBC $44

This is the final examination of Medieval history as Europe shifts from a world based on faith and fragmented kingdoms to a more secular and nationalistic world. It was a messy and glorious explosion of science and reason affecting the practical world with new laws and inventions and opening up the world of art with proportion and perspective. This was epitomized in the year 1492, when the Muslims left Spain for good, the Inquisition began in earnest, and Columbus landed in the West Indies. Kristi Busch holds an MA in museum studies from George Washington University. 4 sessions. *This class is concurrent with C876 The International Student Experience.


√ EMAIL IN A MOBILE WORLD

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C854 01/07/15-01/14/15 Wednesday 10:00am–12:00pm Brain Boston CON $22

Email was one of the first Internet services, originally designed to have one account sending and receiving on one computer. Today's email usage often involves multiple accounts across multiple computing devices. How can you use the same email account on different devices—smartphone, tablet, desktop, and laptop? Does it make sense to use multiple email addresses? In the first session we will explore your options and how you can keep your email secure and private. You will learn how to recognize and manage spam, hoaxes and email phishing attacks. For the second session, bring your mobile device and discover tips and tricks to keep your email experience safe and sane. Brian Boston's three years of teaching computer classes for CRI cap his 36 years of experience with technology support. 2 sessions.


√ AMERICAN COLLECTORS' MUSEUMS

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C900 01/07/15–01/28/15 Wednesdays 1:00pm–3:00pm Rebecca Albiani CON $49

"Years ago I decided that the greatest need in our Country was Art"— Isabella Stewart Gardner, 1917. The United States possesses numerous art museums created from personal collections. We will examine the often quirky history of collectors' art museums in America, ranging from the Wadsworth Atheneum, established in Hartford in 1842, to the Rubin Museum of Himalayan art, opened in Manhattan in 2004. Half of each class will cover a particular museum in depth, including the colorful personalities who collected the art, the architecture of the museum, and the objects favored for each: Renaissance art for the Gardener, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism for the Barnes Foundation, "Non-Objective Painting" for the Guggenheim, and classical antiquities for the Getty. The rest of each class introduces other institutions founded in the same era and discusses issues surrounding collecting and display from those periods. Rebecca Albiani earned a BA degree in art history and Italian at University of California, Berkeley, and an MA in Renaissance art history at Stanford. She gives a popular lecture series at the Frye Art Museum. 4 sessions.


√ WRITING HISTORICAL NOVELS

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C996 01/08/15 Thursday 10:00am–12:00pm William Dietrich CON $16

A discussion of the publishing industry and the research and writing process of the historical novel of the Roman, Nazi and Napoleanic periods. For seniors interested in the creation of historical fiction or their own writing projects, research techniques, book structure and the interplay of realism and fiction will be discussed. William (Bill) Dietrich is the author of 19 books, including "New York Times" best-selling Ethan Gage series of Napoleanic adventures. He is a career journalist who won a Pulitzer Prize at the "Seattle Times" for coverage of the Exxon Valdez oil spill. His Northwest nonfiction has won the Washington Governor's Book Award and Pacific NW Publisher's Award. Bill lives in Anacortes. 1 session.


√ CURRENT ISSUES IN ECONOMICS

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C872 01/08/15–01/29/15 Thursdays 1:00pm–3:00pm Lewis Mandell CON $44

Major international, national and local economic issues that impact our lives are constantly changing. Examples of international economic issues include currency changes, international trade and energy prices. National issues may include Federal Reserve Monetary Policy, algorithmic stock trading and income inequality, while local issues may include the impact of a $15 minimum wage and the effect of closing the Import/Export Bank on Boeing and the local economy. Lewis Mandell, has held professorships at a number of leading universities, most recently the UW, where he is currently professor emeritus. His most recent book on financial cognition, released in 2013, is "What to Do When I Get Stupid." 4 sessions.


√ NATURAL SUPERNATURAL: NORDIC FOLKLORE

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C916 01/09/15–01/23/15 Fridays 1:00pm–3:00pm Lars Jenner CON $33

Scandinavia offers a rich body of folklore rooted in oral tradition and customary example. Part of this may have to do with a belief in the mysteries of nature, part of it may be Scandinavia's relatively late Christianization, its interest in collecting and remembering traditional lore, its identifying national traits in the stories of the people, perhaps all of these combined. We will lay the groundwork for understanding folklore studies, then spend time sampling and discussing folklore from multiple genres. Lars Jenner holds an MA in Scandinavian languages, literature and folklore from the University of Washington, a PhD from U Penna, and is currently a Lecturer in Scandinavian Mythology and Saga of the Vikings at the UW Department of Scandinavian Studies. He is developing an online version of the Sagas course. 3 sessions.


√ THE CHANGING WORLD OF ENERGY 2015

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C870 01/09/15-01/30/15 Fridays 10:00am–12:00pm Bernard Silbernagel CPC $44

Europe is emerging from its deepest economic crisis since the 1930s. The severity of the Great Recession created what many observers consider to be the greatest crisis in the history of the European Union, threatening the stability of the euro single currency and undermining confidence in European integration. How has Europe responded to the crisis and what will be the long term impact on the EU’s development? This course will seek to provide perspectives on these issues, while also offering an overview of the basic nature and functions of the European Union. Philip Shekleton is the Associate Director of the European Union Center of Excellence of Seattle and the Center for West European Studies, both at the UW. 1 session.


√ PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN CARDIOVASCULAR FUNCTION (repeat from spring 2014)

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C892 01/15/5-02/05/15 Thursdays 9:30am–11:30am Steve Trautwein CON  $44

The structure of the heart and blood vessels determines their function. We will discuss the basic anatomy of heart and vessels, anatomical characteristics of the functions of these organs, mechanisms of control of heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, resistance and blood pressure, and the functional characteristics of hemoglobin as it relates to the effective transport of blood within the body. The last part of the course will be devoted to a superficial discussion of selected cardiovascular pathologies in terms of aberrations of the "normal" structure/function relationships. Medical (i.e. diagnosis and treatment) issues will not be discussed. Steve Trautwein has a BA degree in biology, Princeton, MSci in zoology, University of Michigan, and PhD in physiology, University of Illinois. 4 sessions.


√ THE INTERNATIONAL STUDENT EXPERIENCE

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C876* 01/20/15–01/27/15 Tuesdays 1:00pm-3:00pm Amanda Fletcher, Kim Kraft, Charlotte West CON $22

A panel of international students attending Edmonds Community College on a scholarship from the US State Department will talk about their experiences in the United States. Discussion may also include topics such as women's issues, marriage and family, religion, and politics. This year's students come from Egypt, Bangladesh, Pakistan, India, Indonesia, Brazil, South Africa and Turkey. The Northwest Community College Initiative (NWCCI) utilizes funding from the U.S. State Department, Bureau of Education and Cultural Affairs, to host young leaders from around the world. NWCCI's goal is to strengthen other societies by developing capable young professionals who will acquire technical and professional skills, leadership abilities, and an understanding of American society, democracy and culture. This presentation will be moderated by staff from the NWCCI program. 2 sessions. *This class is concurrent with C906 Late Medieval History Section A.


√ MONSTERS AND HYBRIDS IN MEDIEVAL ENGLISH LITERATURE

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C915 01/21/15-02/11/15 Wednesdays 10:00am-12:00pm Angela Sucich CON $44

Monsters haunt the borders of culture, their strange and "unnatural" bodies lending face or form to what cannot be fully imagined, understood or accepted as part of the natural order. But what is it exactly that monsters reveal to us? What can they teach us? Representations of monsters in medieval literature and art invite comparison and analysis, even identification. The humanoid, man-eating monsters that challenge the titular, epic hero of "Beowulf" may reveal with what the poem's readers and writers identify. The shape-shifting creatures in Marie de France's "Lais," from the werewolf Bisclavret, to the morphing bird-man of "Yonec"—may have much to say about human reason and animal impulses. Along with these medieval English texts, we will seek out monsters, hybrids and oddities in selections of Old English poems, Middle English romances, bestiaries and travel narratives. Reading List: "Beowulf," selections from "The Wonders of the East," "The Letter of Alexander to Aristotle," "The Liber Monstrorum," Marie de France's "Lais" and "The King of Tars." Images: Manuscript art and marginalia, bestiaries, World Maps. Only "Beowulf" need be purchased, preferred translation by Roy Liuzza. Other readings will be provided as handouts in class. Angela Sucich taught college courses in literature and writing at the University of Colorado-Boulder, Metropolitan State College of Denver and the University of Washington where she earned her PhD in medieval literature. 4 sessions.


√ LATE MEDIEVAL HISTORY: THE PHOENIX RISING SECT. B

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C906* 01/30/15–02/20/15 Fridays 1:00pm-3:00pm Kristi Busch CPC $44

This is the final examination of Medieval history as Europe shifts from a world based on faith and fragmented kingdoms to a more secular and nationalistic world. It was a messy and glorious explosion of science and reason affecting the practical world with new laws and inventions and opening up the world of art with proportion and perspective. This was epitomized in the year 1492, when the Muslims left Spain for good, the Inquisition began in earnest, and Columbus landed in the West Indies. Kristi Busch holds an MA museum studies from George Washington University. 4 sessions. The walk from the parking lot to the classroom is approximately one block. *This class is concurrent with C944 Comparative Religion.


√ JOURNEYS OF PAUL

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C946 02/03/15–02/24/15 Tuesdays 10:00am-12:00pm Richard Gibson ESC $44

Come with us as we explore the fascinating journeys of Paul to discover how and when
Christianity spread during the First Century. Using a combination of "Bible"
stories, maps and slides, we will grasp the impact of this new religion on the
eastern region of the Mediterranean. Dick Gibson is a retired pastor from
Terrace Presbyterian Church in Mountlake Terrace, amateur archeologist and a
popular CRI instructor for many years. 4 sessions.


√ YEARING TO BE FREE: STILL A NATION OF IMMIGRANTS

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C878 02/03/15-02/17/15 Tuesdays 1:00pm–3:00pm Daniel Perez CON $33

Over a hundred years after the words of Emma Lazarus were inscribed on the Statue of Liberty, the US is still the world's leading destination for immigrants. Recent census data analysis shows that our total immigrant population is over 40 million, including 11 million undocumented immigrants. For those born outside the US what are the paths to legal residence? What rights and representation are they entitled to under current law? This class will help you understand immigration from different perspectives: social, legal, political and human. You will learn about the basics of immigration law, the difference between asylum and refugee status, the naturalization and citizenship processes, special immigration statuses, and types of visas. Daniel Perez is a Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) Accredited Representative and has been the general intake and outreach coordinator at Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP) since 1997. Appointed by the Washington Supreme Court as a non-lawyer member of the Washington State Practice of Law Board for the period 2004-2008 and reappointed for the period 2008-2011, he is also a former professor at the Universidad Autonoma de la Laguna, Torreon, Mexico. 3 sessions.


√ READING WILLIAM BUTLER YEATS

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C917 02/05/15–02/26/15 Thursdays 12:30pm–2:30pm Sean Taylor CON $44

W.B. Yeats, considered by many the finest poet in the English language of the 20th century, referred to himself late in life as "the last romantic." He was a driving force behind the Irish Literary Revival. Our readings will focus on the development of Yeats' conception of poetic imagination. We will be using M.L. Rosenthal's edition of the "Selected Poems," widely available (on Kindle, as well). There are different editions containing a different number of Yeats' plays. Any edition will suffice. Students are asked to read through the selections from Crossways, The Rose, The Wind Among the Reeds, and In the Seven Woods for the first class meeting. Sean Taylor holds a PhD in English from the UW and has taught as a professor at Portland State University and Hamilton College. His main areas of expertise are Old and Middle English literature. 4 sessions.


√ WINESBURG, OHIO: SHERWOOD ANDERSON

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C920 02/06/15–02/20/15 Fridays 9:30am-11:30am Dennis Peters CON $33

Anderson was greatly influenced and inspired by E.L. Masters' "Spoon River Anthology."

His own life in small towns resembled that of Masters. With the revelation of suppressed lives in "Spoon River" as his model, Anderson expands on the passionate inner lives in powerfully intertwined short stories. Winesburg, Ohio went on to influence yet another generation of writers, including Ernest Hemingway. Dennis Peters has been teaching humanities courses in high school, community college and CRI. 3 sessions.


√ COMPARATIVE RELIGION--FULL

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C944* 02/06/15–02/27/15 Fridays 1:00pm-3:00pm David E. Smith CON $44

Are they a mass of confusion or a world of opportunity? We will survey and compare the central beliefs of the major world religions with attention paid to both similarities and differences. Traditions covered include Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Chinese Religion. David E. Smith grew up in the home of a fundamentalist Christian minister. As an adult he gradually moved away from that paradigm and became a religious progressive/skeptic. After earning an MA in philosophy of religion, he received a second MA and a PhD in religious studies, Temple University, Philadelphia. He now teaches for the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the UW, and offers workshops and seminars in comparative religion, philosophy of religion, and contemporary ethics. 4 sessions. *This class is concurrent with C982 Alfred Hitchcock Goes to Hollywood: Three Classic Movies and C908 Late Medieval History: Phoenix Rising, Section B.


√ CONSIDERING EXPLORING WINDOWS 8.1 AND FUTURE VERSIONS

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C850 02/11/15 Wednesday 1:00pm–3:00pm Brian Boston CON $11

It has been over two years since Microsoft released its most radically different and controversial version of the Windows operating system. While some have embraced it, many have not. The release of Windows 8.1 and its subsequent updates have brought back a number of people discouraged by the previous version. Is it the right choice for you? Or should you wait for the next version due out in the spring? Join us as we explore the options and what makes the most sense for you. Brian Boston's three years of teaching computer classes for CRI cap his 36 years of experience with technology support. 1 session.


√ DANISH CRIME NOVELS

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C913 02/12/15–03/05/15 Thursdays 9:30am–11:30am Jim and Pat Thyden CON $44

This class provides an introduction to Denmark through popular crime novels. Class discussions and Power Point slides will focus on Denmark's history, culture and nature, as well as plots and characters, rather than literary analysis. Students should read "The Exception" by Christian Jungersen before the first class meeting. Then we will read in order: "The Keeper of Lost Causes/Mercy," by Jussi Adler-Olsen; "Smilla's Sense of Snow" by Peter Hoeg; and "The Boy in the Suitcase" by Kaaberbol and Friis. All are available at Amazon.com. Jim Thyden is a retired Foreign Service officer who has worked and traveled extensively in Scandinavia. He earned his MA at the University of Washington Department of Scandinavian Studies and has taught many CRI classes on international affairs and Scandinavian crime novels. Pat has lived and traveled in Scandinavia with Jim and has taught several CRI classes. 4 sessions.


√ "THE ALBERTA TRILOGY" BY CORA SANDEL

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C912 02/18/15-03/11/15 Wednesday 10:00am-12:00pm Katherine Hanson CON $44

Cora Sandel was the pseudonym of Sara Fabricius (1880-1974). As a young woman Sara studied painting, but her artistic breakthrough was as a writer of fiction: "Alberta and Jacob" (1926) was the first volume of a trilogy about a young woman's struggle to find and develop her creative voice. The next two volumes, "Alberta and Freedom" and "Alberta Alone," were published in 1931 and 1939. Focus will be on Sandel's "Alberta Trilogy" (reading and discussing), but will also make a brief survey of Norwegian women painters of the late 19th century, in particular Harriet Backer (1845-1932), the first woman painter to operate an art school in Norway, which Sara Fabricius attended. Katherine Hanson is currently an affiliate associate professor in Department of Scandinavian Studies at the University of Washington. 4 sessions.


√ FUTURE CLIMATE OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C956 02/18/15-03/11/15 Wednesdays 1:00pm-3:00pm Edward Sarachik CON $44

An exploration of future climate in our region and its implications for all of us will help you to understand the basic concepts of climate itself. Armed with an understanding of past and present climate, you will better understand future climate and the changes that may occur. Ed Sarachik is currently emeritus professor of atmospheric science at the UW. He has taught and published extensively in meteorology, oceanography, and climate and is co-author of a book on the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon, published by Cambridge University Press. 4 sessions.


√ MADE IN THE USA: THREE CENTURIES OF AMERICAN

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C922 02/19/15-03/12/15 Thursdays 3:30pm-5:30pm Steve Reeder CPC $49

Although not widely known, classical music in this country has its roots in the eighteenth century, even as contemporaries of Mozart began cultivating a fresh approach in the New World. Such composers as William Billings and Alexander Reinagle melded the European tradition with the sounds of the churches, fields, and taverns during the late colonial and revolutionary periods.

We will trace that history over three centuries, from the time of the Founding Fathers through the leading Romantics of the nineteenth century to the giants of the twentieth: Gershwin, Copland, Bernstein, and Glass. We will hear how elements as diverse as "Yankee Doodle," "Twinkle, Twinkle," ragtime, and jazz contributed to a distinctly American classical music scene. Steve Reeder programs and hosts classical music shows for Northwest Public Radio, serves as a pre-concert speaker for the Seattle Symphony, and is the on-stage narrator for the orchestra's multi-media concert series, "Beyond the Score." 4 sessions. The walk from the parking lot to the classroom is approximately 1 ½ blocks.


√ SHAKESPEARE'S "MEASURE FOR MEASURER"

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C918* 02/24/5–03/17/15 Tuesdays 1:00pm-3:00pm Sean Taylor FBC $44

We will undertake a discussion of one of Shakespeare's "problem plays," which will be staged by Seattle Shakespeare Company during the same time frame as the course, so that our reading may be informed by both the text and by the live performance. Fraught with difficult questions of justice, mercy and the instability of Truth, the play's themes remain vitally relevant to our own time. Students are requested to read through Act 2 for the first class meeting. Any edition of the play will do, though it is recommended to find one with annotations, and with line numbers.

Sean Taylor holds a PhD in English from the UW and has taught as a professor at Portland State University and Hamilton College. His main areas of expertise are Old and Middle English literature. 4 sessions. *This class is concurrent with C902 The American Revolution.


√ SOCIOLOGY MEETS LITERATURE: STRATIFICATION

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C919 02/23/15–03/16/15 Mondays 10:00am–12:00pm Ellen Berg CON $44

All men may be created equal, but men, women and children in all societies are treated differently. Some are ranked higher and some lower according to a valued criterion. Brains, brawn, beauty—anything can be valued, and so can be the basis of the rankings which form the kind of pattern sociologists call stratification. We will read four short stories which will facilitate our discussion of common forms of stratification in America (e.g. by race and wealth), and of how stratification works in our social circles and intimate relations. Take Note: The stories,by James Baldwin, Sherwood Anderson, Flannery O'Connor, and Susan Sontag will be available by email. Ellen Z. Berg has taught sociological ideas using literature and at CRI has used short stories to discuss the process of socialization and essays to explore the theme of the family. 4 sessions.


√ SHORELINES OF THE WORLD

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C960 02/23/15-03/16/15 Mondays 1:00pm–3:00pm Linda Khandro CON $44

Coastlines or shorelines bound all our land masses—or do they bind the oceans? We will start with a tour of some coasts around the world: Ireland, New Zealand, Mexico's Baja and Yucatan Peninsulas, Cape Cod, and the coast of British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest. We will then see how the processes and energy at the coastal boundaries of crustal motions, changing sea level, waves, beach deposits, all shape and reshape our coastlines. Linda Khandro is a geologist with an MS degree in earth science. 4 sessions.


√ THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION -- FULL

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C902 02/24/15-03/17/15 Tuesdays 1:00pm-3:00pm James Rigali CON $44

The American Revolution was a most improbable historical event. A new nation with no established army or navy takes on the most powerful nation and army of its day and defeats it to win independence. But it was not just a colonial struggle for independence; it was also a civil war. The series will explore the important intellectual and political ideas that shaped the Revolution as well as the impact of the war on colonial society and the people who lived through the conflict. The legacy of the war included reshaping ideas about social classes and hierarchy, social and economic mobility, and women's role in society and government. James Rigali earned his PhD in history at University of Washington. 4 sessions. *This class is concurrent with C918 Shakespeare's "Measure for Measure


√ ALFRED HITCHCOCK GOES TO HOLLYWOOD: TREE CLASSIC FILMS

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C982* 02/27/15-03/13/15 Fridays 1:00pm-3:30pm John James CPC $42

The legendary independent film producer, David O. Selznick, wanted Alfred Hitchcock to come to Hollywood to make movies for him. Hitchcock was eager to take on the challenge. He and his wife and daughter moved to the United States in 1939, and Hitchcock, the most famous and acclaimed movie director in England, was ready to go to work in the movie capitol of the world—Hollywood, California. This winter enjoy three of Alfred Hitchcock's first Hollywood films: "Rebecca" (1940); "Mr. and Mrs. Smith" (1941); and "Suspicion" (1941). Featured performers include Judith Anderson, Nigel Bruce, Reginald Denny, Joan Fontaine, Cary Grant, Sir Cedric Hardwicke, Carole Lombard, Robert Montgomery, Laurence Olivier, and George Sanders. View movies directed by the "master of suspense" and see his one and only screwball comedy, "Mr. and Mrs. Smith." There will be special handouts, an opportunity to discuss each film, and special refreshments at each session. John James is a retired librarian from Shoreline Community College with advanced degrees in history and library science, and a life-long interest in movies from the '30s, '40s, and '50s. 3 sessions. The walk from the parking lot to the classroom is approximately one block. *This class is concurrent with C944 Comparative Religion and C852 The E-book Conundrum: Libraries and Their Digital Customers.


√ FACT AND FICTION -- FULL

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C914 02/27/15-03/20/15 Fridays 9:30am-11:30am Bev Christensen and Marge Young FBC No Fee

We are not your average book discussion group! Participants make their own reading choices and come prepared to present brief reviews and share their appraisals. You may select a past or current author in any genre. Learn from each other through informal discussion. Marge Young and Bev Christensen are avid readers and have been a part of this class for years. This is a non-fee class but requires registration. If this is the ONLY class being taken, there is no processing fee. 4 sessions.


√ HEALTHY AGING

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C890 03/03/15-03/17/15 Tuesdays 10:00am-12:00pm Linda Whitesell ESC $33

Although aging is a normal process, healthy aging is a challenge that can be accomplished through education and self-management. Learn how to prevent or lessen many of the barriers that occur during the aging process with an examination of the demographics, myths and theories about aging, along with treatments and prevention tips. Then focus on developing healthy habits for aging well, despite physical changes and common chronic conditions. Linda Whitesell is a retired geriatric nurse practitioner who worked with seniors for most of her 46 years as a nurse. Linda has developed and presented many programs to professional staff and adults in the community setting and has taught gerontology courses at Edmonds Community College. 3 sessions.


√ EUROPEAN UNION UPDATE: EUROPE AFTER AFTER THE CRISIS --FULL

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C874 03/05/15-03/12/15 Thursdays 12:30pm-2:30pm Philip Shekleton CON $22

Europe is slowly emerging from its deepest economic crisis since the 1930s. The Great Recession created what many observers consider to be the greatest crisis in the history of European integration, threatening the stability of the euro single currency and undermining confidence in the European Union. The success of anti-Europe parties in the recent European Parliament elections and the rise of right-wing parties in many European countries reflect the growing disenchantment found today among the European public. At the same time, Europe has deepened integration to hopefully avoid a future crisis. This course will seek to provide perspectives on these issues, as well as provide a basic overview of the functioning European Union. Philip Shekleton is the Associate Director of the EU Center of Excellence at the UW. He leads a Brussels student study program on the EU and gives outreach talks on EU topics in the local community. A guest speaker from the UW will share in the presentation. 2 sessions.


 √ THE E-BOOK CONUNDRUM: LIBRARIES AND THEIR DIGITAL CUSTOMERS

Number Date Day Time Instructor Location Cost
C852* 03/06/15-03/13/15 Fridays 1:00pm-3:00pm Nancy Messenger and Jim McCluskey CON $22

Over 20% of adults in the US have read an e-book in the last year, while ownership of e-readers and tablet computers seems to double over the holiday gift-giving periods. Although printed books still dominate their collections, libraries are challenged to serve the increasing number of avid readers who want e-books. How do libraries balance the demand and manage the cost? How do copyright, pricing and lending restrictions impact library users' access to e-books? Learn about the basics of e-book publishing, some common types of e-reading devices, Digital Rights Management (DRM), e-book subscription services, and the issues for libraries. You will come away with a better understanding of the paradigm shift from print to digital and how libraries are providing and advocating for access to e-books. Nancy Messenger has an MA in librarianship from the UW and has worked at Seattle Public and Sno-Isle Libraries. She currently manages the Collection Development Department at Sno-Isle. Nancy will be joined by Jim McCluskey who has been working with e-books and other digital media since 2005 and has done presentations about e-books and libraries at state and national conferences. 2 sessions. *This class is concurrent with C982 Alfred Hitchcock Goes to Hollywood: Three Classic Movies.